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Conifers That Thrive in Middle Tennessee

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Conifers That Thrive in Middle Tennessee

Joy Boven, Landscape Specialist at Bates Nursery and conifer enthusiast, goes over coniferous trees and shrubs that thrive in Middle Tennessee. Joy covers basic conifer care as well as tips for picking out the right conifer for your space.

 

 

 

Plants Mentioned in This Webinar:

 

Evergreen Conifers

 

Cedrus/Cedar 

atlantica – Atlas Cedar: 

Glauca

Fastigiata

Horstmann – Smaller version

deodara – Deodar Cedar 

Large

Aurea

Karl Fuchs

Kashmir

Weeping

Feelin’ Blue

Feelin’ Sunny

Devinely Blue

 

 

Chamaecyparis/False Cypress 

obtusa – Hinoki Cypress 

Large

Gracilis

Crippsii

Compacta

Confucious

Iseli Green

Dwarf

Nana and Nana Lutea

Night Light

Butterball

Spiralis

Fernspray and Fernspray Gold

pisifera – Threadleaf False Cypress 

Gold Mop 8x8; the most important information I can give you for this plant is to plan for how BIG it will get. It is common practice, it seems these days, to plant this like it will stay the size as when you bought it. I promise this will get every bit of 8x8 here in middle tn and you should plan for it.

Pisifera filifera – Threadleaf False Cypress: This is the green version of the gold mop but gets 12x12 instead of 8x8

Smaller Spawns of the Gold Mop

King’s Gold

Vintage Gold

Paul’s Gold

Golden Charm

 

 

Cryptomeria/Japanese Cedar 

KEY NOTES: Protection is key to avoiding winter burn with the Japanese Cedar. Not the best for planting in an open area exposure. These typically like regions a bit further south of us, but in the city here it stays a bit warmer and more protected, these can certainly thrive.

Japonica 

Large

Yoshino

Radicans

Dwarf

Globosa

Chapel View

 

 

Cupressus/Cypress 

arizonica – Arizona Cypress 

This is one of my FAVORITES for our region. Super drought tolerant, they have a lovely, unique scent and though I won’t say they are completely disease and pest resistant, they are pretty darn close

Carolina Sapphire

Blue Ice

Blue Pyramid

Chapparal

Aurea

x leylandii (macrocarpa x nootkatensis) 

Murray

Gold Rider

nootkatensis – Alaskan Cedar (Cypress) 

There are several mature and healthy specimens of this plant around town and I promote it whenever I can to those interested in something a little more unusual.

Green Arrow – Much more narrow than the other cultivars available.

Jubilee

Pendula

 

 

Juniperus/Juniper 

chinensis – Chinese Juniper 

Large (Pyramidal)

Hetzi Columnaris (Green Columnar)

Spartan

Blue Point

Medium Shrub Form

Angelica Blue

Daub’s Frosted

Mint Julep

conferta – Shore Juniper 

Blue Pacific

Golden Pacific

horizontalis – Creeping Juniper 

Blue Rug (Wiltonii)

Icee Blue

Mother Lode

Blue Chip

procumbens – Japanese Garden Juniper 

nana

virginiana – Eastern Red Cedar 

Large

Taylor

This IS the substitution for Italian Cypress for our region. Though used in much of the southern region, Italian Cypress just does not fair well in middle Tennessee. The answer is Taylor Juniper. It is estimated to get 30’ tall and 3’ wide.

Brodie

Canaertii - Slim

Shrub

Grey Owl

I freaking love this shrub! Some plant tags will say it gets 3 feet tall. Plan on 5 feet and 8 feet wide and don’t be surprise if it exceeds those expectations. If this plant is happy, it gets BIG!

 

 

Picea – Spruce 

abies – Norway Spruce 

Large

Cupressina 

Straight Species

Weeping

Frohburg

Formanek

Cobra

Gold Drift

Pendula

Dwarf Forms

Acrocona

Pusch

Sherwood Compact

orientalis – Oriental Spruce

I have seen these do incredibly well in the Nashville Area!

Shadow’s Broom

Skylands

Firefly

pungens – Colorado Blue Spruce 

Buyer’s beware: this is a VERY popular plant. But foresight is required. This plant needs adequate air flow and does not do well in a stuffy location where our summer humidity makes it harder on this plant than necessary. Ideal location would be morning sun-afternoon sun to about 3 and then reprieve. It’s called Colorado Spruce for a reason. When planting this species, keep an eye on water for at least a year. Making sure that is getting enough to become established. It is not impossible for this plant to live here, but they certainly require proper placement and additional care to get comfortable in our southern climate.

Large

Iseli Fastigiate

Hoopsii

Fat Albert

Dwarf

Montgomery

Globosa

Sester Dwarf

Weeping

The Blues

 

 

Pinus/Pine 

flexilis – Limber Pine 

Extra Blue

Vanderwolf’s Blue

heldreichii – Bosnian Pine 

Small

Irish Bell 10x12

Mint Truffle 10x6

Indigo Eyes

mugo – Mugo Pine

Pumilo

Carstens Gold

nigra – Austrian Pine

Oregon Green

Frank

palustris – Longleaf Pine: these pines once dominated the eastern forests of America but are now occupy 3% of their original coverage. There is a big push to replant these Pines and if you have the space for one and like contributing to a good cause, but all means, please plant one! They are definitely slow to get started but have such a unique growth habit. It needs lots of space so not recommended for a small lot but if you have a decent plot, this is a great addition!

parviflora – Japanese White Pine

I have been watching these for some time now and I am very impressed at how they are able to hold up to our heat and humidity!

Glauca Brevifolia

Goldilocks

Aoi

Blue Angel (FAVORITE)

strobus – Eastern White Pine 

Straight species is great but give it plenty of ROOM! Not recommended for small lots!

Small

Blue Shag

Weeping

Angel Falls

Niagara Falls

thunbergii – Japanese Black Pine

Thunderhead

 

 

Thuja/Arborvitae 

occidentalis – Northern White Cedar 

Large

Emerald Green

Degroot’s Spire

Rushmore

Holmstrup

They are coming out with new cultivars on the daily. So if you try one of these new cultivars abide by the same rules of care but pay attention to the max height and width they are estimated to get and plan accordingly.

Dwarf Sports

Rheingold

Fire Chief

Bowling Ball

(Platycladus) orientalis

Morgan

Plicata – Western Red Cedar

Grune Kugel (Dwarf)

Whipcord (Crazy Weirdo)

Lucky Find

Standishii (Japanese Arborvitae) x plicata (Western Red Cedar)

Green Giant – 40-60’ x 12-18’ wide. Plan for that. I see these planted 5 feet apart sometimes. Plan for at least 12’! These lovely screening trees get BIG, plan for it. They do not disappoint either.

 

 

Tsuga/Hemlock 

Canadensis – Canadian Hemlock 

The US champion is in the great smoky mountains. 165 tall with a trunk that spans 6 feet wide. If you plant this tree, please keep that in mind. Though it may not get as big as a smoky mountains grand champion, you still need to be aware of what it is capable of. So please for the love of all that is good and holy, do not make this a foundation planting.

Dwarf

Cole’s Prostrate

 

 

Deciduous Conifers

 

 

Taxodium 

distichum var. distichum – Bald Cypress 

Weeping

Fallingwater (Don Shadow introduction)

Cascade Falls

Columnar

Peve Minaret

distichum var. imbricarium – Pond Cypress

 

 

Metasequoia/Dawn Redwood 

Glyptostroboides 

Straight species – Give these beauties LOTS of room! There are countless mature specimens around town and all I can tell you is they get HUGE! 80 to 100 feet for sure!

Odon (Gold Rush) – Not a dwarf, but has more yellow foliage. Absolutely beautiful foliar color.

Miss Grace (Weeping)

Hamlet’s Broom (Dwarf) 8x6

Amber Glow

 

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